Ways To Use Whiteboard Animation Videos In Your Business

Over the last several years, the use of videos to promote business has been steadily rising. These days, people are using pens, markers, and drawings to present their ideas, and to connect with people. Video scribing is now the newest technique in organic message delivery.

This method is also known as whiteboard animation. It takes the drawing from its fixed time and place, and enables you to upload, broadcast and share it. Many organizations are now looking for ways they can use business animation videos to their advantage. There are many ways but the most effective are:

Front page

Certainly, a whiteboard animation is an excellent tool for telling your story. You can use this video to tell a nice story about how your products or services fit into the lives of your consumers and enhance their experience. It may include a short explanation of the product or service, company history or the main principle that elevates you from your competition. Keep videos of this nature short, usually not more than 2 minutes.

Diving into specifics

Apart from using these videos to tell your top-level story, they are perfect for explaining in-depth specific processes, products or services. At first, the consumers are not looking for complex explanations. However, the more they click through your videos the more they are interested in your company. You should keep them interested by offering more details of certain services or products they have shown interest. Keep these videos shorten than 5 minutes.

Information graphics

Whiteboard animation videos are excellent for information graphics or simply infographics. These videos display all the information on certain topic while showing side-by-side comparisons of graphs and statistics.

If you want to capture the attention of the viewer, you should use visuals and highly entertaining graphs. A whiteboard animation turns the statistics and facts into motion. This has a profound effect on the viewers since they are able to see these things in a more graphic way.

Advocacy and innovation

You can also use whiteboard animation to share your organization’s ideas on education, social environments and motivation. Such videos are powerful for affecting the thoughts of viewers and influencing change.

If you are dealing with issues that are not yet reality, you can use the power of imagination to illustrate to the viewers what is possible. The greatest advantage of whiteboard animations is that they are not limited by photography or video, and can reach deeper imagination with little work.

4 Ways to Speed Up Your Animation Working Time

One of the most important things ever in any project is the ability to save time. Perfectionists need to save time, so they can improve their work. Directors need to have the project ahead of time to review the work again and again and handle any changes before the deadline. Big studios need to be ahead of schedule.

So, here comes the bummer. Who is the one with the responsibility to deliver an animation on time? Well. Bad news. You. Yes, you, the Animator. The fate of humanity rests on your shoulders, think of yourself of a Hero on a journey that needs a couple of tips to make the adventure more enjoyable and short.

I. HAVE A HIGH APM (Actions Per Minute)

To be faster at anything, you need to have a way to measure Actions Per Minute. There are two ways to copy and paste anything in the virtual world. Navigating to the EDIT Menu, and select COPY, then move your mouse again all the way to the EDIT menu, and then click on PASTE. Or! You can press and hold the CTRL key on your keyboard (CMD on Mac), and rapidly press “C” then “V”. Right? Using your keyboard can get a higher APM than navigating through menus.

Use Shortcuts! I’ve seen some professionals navigate through menus to get things done, it’s embarrassing. Believe it or not, just by using shortcuts, I’m 20% faster than other animators. So what? Well, when I do freelance projects, clients hire me because they know I deliver ahead of time, because, even though we do the same things sharing the same process, I do it faster (using shortcuts).

Customize Shortcuts. Some software like After Effects doesn’t allow you to customize your shortcuts, but if you can, DO IT! The best Keyboard Profile is the one that handles your most used shortcuts near your right hand. The less your right hand has to move from left to right on the keyboard, the better. That’s why you should try to have all the major functions close in your keyboard “mapping”. Examples could be: CTRL+F, CTRL+G, CTRL+TAB, CTRL+SHIFT+W, SHIFT+3, ALT+SHIFT+3, etc. They are all close together.

Consider using a Gaming Keyboard, Gaming Mouse or Gaming Keypad. The one I recommend the most is the Gaming Keypad (like Razer Orbweaver or Logitech G13) because when the software doesn’t support shortcut customization, you can customize your Keypad to have all the major functions next to each other, and better yet, instead of pressing 3 keys (like CTRL+SHFT+P), you only press one single key on your keypad.

Automate using Macros. You can do this if you have a Gaming Mouse, Gaming Keyboard or Gaming Keypad. A macro is a sequence of key presses that can be automated into a single press of a dedicated key on your keypad. For example. In after effects

II. OPTIMIZE YOUR ANIMATION PROCESS

Optimizing means to make the best use of the resources at your disposal for your project. So the best way to approach your animation process is by handling the 2 most important things in any project. Your Pipeline and your starting Keyframes

Optimized Pipeline. The folder structure of all your files is vital to handling the project with ease. Have folders separately for your sounds, music, pictures, video references, characters and project files (toon boom, after effects, etc.). In our studio, if we do a bit of motion graphics, we have them in a folder named AFTER EFFECTS, and the main project in a folder named TOON BOOM, then the edited animation on PREMIERE. So if any changes have to be made, we know what folder to look, and if we need an audio file, we know exactly where to find it. Every Animation school is teaching the importance of this, and is not just because it looks cleaner and more beautiful, but because it works.

Set Up Key Poses first, handle details later. Yes, yes, you want to impress your boss or your friends, with how expressive your characters can be. It’s better if you block (pose your character) the important keyframes first, the starting position, the middle of the action and the aftermath. And then add additional animation later on.

III. USE A GOOD RIG (Avoid unreliable ones)

Using a good quality rig is essential, having to modify keyframes and poses only means that the rig is not good and is making you waste time. A good rig allows you to be free and more creative, because you can make your character change it’s posing with ease, so your animation process is more dynamic. If you are unable to come up with a good rig, then outsource (have someone else do it for you) or use the rig only to get the key poses, then, forget about the rig and handle additional animation (like hands, tail, hair) manually.

One quick way to know if the Rig is good, is by understanding Inverse Kinematics, and having them in your rig. If you don’t know what inverse kinematics means, check this video: http://vimeo.com/96444901

IV. RECYCLE WHAT YOU CAN

Recycle Keyframes. Don’t waste time blocking the character again, when the pose is very similar to one previously blocked, you can copy and paste keyframes and tweak them. For example, if you have a fighter giving a low punch, and you later need a high punch, copy and paste the pose, and then modify it. You will have the correct hip rotation, foot position, and will only need to modify the height position of the fist and maybe the torso. That’s faster than having to block everything.

Recycle Animations. I’m referring to a sequence of keyframes here. The most common example is eye blinking. Instead of manually opening and closing the eyes in the timeline, you copy and paste keyframes across it. Another example would be a walk cycle: if you need to have the character walking and doing something with the hands, like giving orders to other characters, you can recycle the animation, but delete the keyframes for the torso, hands and head, and animate them. This way, half of the work is already done.

Use Older Animations as Reference. Sometimes the timing is perfect and the animation curves (for the interpolation) give you the smoothness you were looking for, but now, you are working on another project and are having problems, you just can’t figure out what you did. This is when a previous animation can help as a reference. All you do is check the number of frames between keyframes, to get the timing right, and check the animation curves.

Instead of wasting time trying to achieve the same result, you can save time by getting the correct calculations checking a previous project. Like the timing and interpolation for the keyframes of the legs in an Angry Walk Cycle, in which every step was so energetic that made kids burst into laughter.

Four Ways Storyboards Facilitate the Animation Process

No animated production can be completed successfully without the use of storyboards. A staple of animation, they have existed since the early 1930s, when Walt Disney implemented them during the development of its films. Since then, they have become an indispensable tool in virtually every animation company, because they enable animation creators to visualize a storyline, determine the sequence of events, choose production details, and save time and money. Following are just a few of the ways in which storyboards and animatics contribute to the success of any animation production.

Storyboards facilitate brainstorming and creativity.

Storyboards are a series of sketches that outline each of the scenes in an animated project. They include information such as which characters and objects populate the scene, which camera angles are being used, what movement is occurring, what dialogue is being spoken, and whatever other material may be useful. Animatics are storyboards to which have been added pieces of animation, movement, and sound to further indicate how the final product will look.

Because storyboards present the details of each scene visually, they are an especially valuable tool for facilitating brainstorming and encouraging creativity. As animators view the project coming to life through the storyboards, they can more easily identify ways to improve the development of the storyline and the scenes.

For instance, storyboards allow animators to move scenes around to experiment with different sequences. Flashbacks are often the result of such experimentation in an animated production or motion picture. In addition, they allow animators to test different iterations of the animation before large commitments of time and money must be made to producing the finished project. As a result, storyboards give the 2D animation studio the freedom to change how the scenes develop and to try out different ideas. This freedom results in a higher-quality and more carefully crafted animation than would otherwise have been possible.

Storyboards save time and money.

While storyboards foster creativity, they also serve a very practical purpose for 2D animation companies and their clients in that they save significant amounts of time and money. Initially, it may seem as if creating storyboards consumes resources, because they must be created with time and talent that could otherwise have been spent producing the final product. However, there are a number of reasons that storyboards are a financially prudent step.

One of these reasons is that storyboards allow animators to identify mistakes and problems before the project goes to production. These errors are simple to fix on a storyboard, because they require nothing more than a quick re-sketching or repositioning of the scene in question. In the middle of production, however, they would be much more costly and time-consuming to repair, because they would require steps such as re-animating an entire scene.

In addition, storyboards save time and money because they allow the animators to determine exactly how each scene will be shot before production begins. This allows the company to save money by determining which shots are most cost effective. Storyboards also save producers from time-consuming tweaking, adjusting, and re-animating during the production phase of the project.

Storyboards guide production.

As mentioned earlier, one of the reasons that storyboards and animatics production in CA and elsewhere save time and money is because they allow the animators to determine exactly how each scene will unfold. The details encompassed by the storyboards include production details such as camera angles and distances. In fact, storyboards and animatics are often utilized to determine which shots will be most effective during the production process.

As a result, by the time the storyboard is finalized, the production process has become much simpler as well. Camera angles and distances, character movements, timelines, and more are clearly laid out on the boards. All that is left is for the producers to implement the scenes as they are described by the sketches in the storyboard. When producers have such a detailed and carefully developed plan for their film or animated cartoons, it becomes much faster and easier for them to create the final project.

In addition, as mentioned earlier, storyboards help to reduce the number of changes that are necessary during the production phase of the animation. As a result, production can move much more quickly because it does not get held up by frequent changes and corrections. The detailed guidance and the improved speed which storyboards lend to the production process make them an indispensable step for anyone who wants to animate a project with speed and economy.

Storyboards provide a way to describe the animation to others.

Finally, storyboards are a valuable addition to any animated production, because they provide a way to describe the animation to others. Often, a project must be described to investors or other interested parties. Vague ideas cannot produce the kind of compelling presentation that will allow a project to receive funding or approval. However, concept design, character design, and carefully crafted storyboards and animatics can take an idea and visualize it in such a way that it is suitable for presentation.

Animation is an exciting, beautiful, and powerful art form that often looks as if its has been effortlessly put together. However, this beauty and power is the result of hard work and careful planning. Part of this planning process is storyboarding. By creating storyboards for your project, an animation studio can help you facilitate brainstorming and creativity, save time and money, guide production, and help others to understand your vision in order to create an excellent animated piece.